Teaching Principles

Teaching Principles

Please be aware that there are many, many websites available on teaching and learning. Just about every large university has a teaching and learning center like UTEP's CETaL and ISS, and they have their own websites. The ones listed here are among the cleanest and easiest to navigate with short, helpful articles on many different topics related to teaching and learning, and some of the better ones have been developed for Graduate Teaching Instructors. We hope these will help you find answers to specific questions. We encourage you to browse, but better than that, enter the websites with a specific purpose. If you cannot find useful information, please contact the CETaL office.

  • Teaching Principles. Visit the Eberly Center's succinct and clear list of teaching principles to find solutions to many issues you may encounter in your class.
  • Teaching strategy and techniques
  1. Teaching with Style. A very useful book with great exercises is Anthony Grasha's Teaching with Style. It helps you connect learning and teaching styles, reflect on your teaching style and develop a conceptual base for it. It is available online for free at teaching with styles website. This text is also available in the UTEP library.
  2. Tools for Teaching. Barbara Gross Davis's classic text Tools for Teaching is also partially available online at Berkeley teaching website. It contains sections on how to prepare or revise a course, the course syllabus, the first day of class, responding to diverse students, discussion strategies, and preparing a lecture, among many others. This text is available in the UTEP library.
  3. The University of Berkeley Graduate Student Instructor Teaching Guide is full of short helpful articles on teaching related issues and a worthwhile resource for faculty and graduate teaching instructors. Similarly, The Center for Teaching and Learning at Stanford University has a handbook on teaching that is available at http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook.pdf, and  compiled a list of newsletters on many teaching and learning topics.
  4. Basics of Teaching. The University of Missouri has an extensive history in Graduate Student Instructor preparation and a very useful site on various topics related to teaching.
  5. Effective Grading. Several chapters in the Grading Handbook (PDF format) published by The Center for Teaching Excellence and The Writing Center at the University of Maryland may be of interest because it provides specific and concrete guidelines for grading student papers. Short chapters such as A Step-by-Step Guide for Effective (and Efficient) Grading, by Linda Coleman, and Concrete Tips for Effective Commenting and Grading, by Tim Helwig may be of broad interest to many.